World Music Supply | Fender Acoustic Guitars

Hey guys, it’s Brian from World Music Supply here again, to supply you with your usual dose of guitar and gear reviews, and today I have a few cool acoustics from our friends over at Fender. Fender has always been a company that really tries to push the limits of what a guitar really is, and in the past they took this mentality to the rather conservative world of acoustic guitars. Many of these guitars went by rather clever monikers, like the Kingman, the Malibu, and the Newporter. Fender tried to introduce their “reinventing the wheel” style of production which had served them so well in the world of electric guitars, basses and amplifiers, however, in the hyper traditional world of acoustic guitars, their efforts failed for much of the companies history. Guitarists just weren’t comfortable having an acoustic with a bolt on neck, or an intonatable metal bridge on their flat top acoustics.

        For many years, Fender just couldn’t figure out what to do to with their acoustic guitar line to make them more acceptable by the mainstream world of guitar players, and it wasn’t until Fender was bought from CBS by FMIC that the quality of their acoustic guitars improved substantially. Nowadays, the acoustic guitars being produced by fender are some of the best selling, and best sounding in the industry. For today’s review I am going to start with the Fender CD-220SCE which features a solid spruce top, laminate ovangkol back and sides, and a fishman pickup system.

The Fender CD-220SCE Solid Spruce Acoustic Electric Guitar

The Fender CD-220SCE Solid Spruce Acoustic Electric Guitar

        The Fender CD-220SCE might seem like a relatively standard acoustic affair, with some relatively standard tones, and some rather typical looks, but while on the surface it looks simple and straight forward, it has so much more depth. The CD-220SCE has a very comfortable neck profile, which is slightly more reminiscent of an electric than a normal acoustic, and the body of the guitar, while being labeled a dreadnought, this guitar feels slightly more slimmed down, and more comfortable than a standard dread. The attached strap button is a nice addition, as surprisingly many acoustic guitars still don’t feature one, and I’ve personally had to install a few on acoustic guitars and am always worried what it will do to the guitars overall value. The inclusion of a strap button makes this guitar extremely comfortable to hold on stage, and the fast playing neck makes it easy to do everything from basic chord work, to lead runs and all the familiar electric guitar style work that acoustic guitars sometimes keep us from executing correctly.

Unplugged this guitar has a very warm tone, with plenty of snap and bite on top. The tone of the CD-220SCE is very modern with lots of bite and chime, the tone is exactly what you would want from a solid spruce guitar, and the ovangkol back and sides add just enough bite to help boost the slightly darker tone of spruce up out of the mix. Plugged in this guitar has a very true acoustic tone, with a nice darker spruce style tone, with enough of that nice piezo sizzle to help really lift your guitar out of the mix. The snappy tone really does a lot for this guitar, and the CD-220SCE is surprisingly resistant to feedback despite the very resonant spruce top.  The CD-220SCE is a nice straight forward acoustic electric, with plenty of modern sound and stage worthy power. For its ability to cover so much ground, at such an affordable price point, the CD-220SCE earns a solid 8 out of 10.

The Fender CD-230 SCE Cedar Top Acoustic Guitar

The Fender CD-230 SCE Cedar Top Acoustic Guitar

Next up is the CD-230SCE which is a slight variation on the CD-220SCE in that this version features a solid cedar top and mahogany back and sides. Cedar features a slightly more vintage sound than spruce does, and has a more “worn in” feel to it, and this guitar features the same super comfortable mahogany neck as the CD-220SCE. Unplugged the CD-230SCE certainly features a more worn in sound than the CD-220, with a lot more mid range warmth. This means that the CD-230 sits in a mix in a nice comfortable place, where it sits along side vocals without taking up any of the frequencies of the singers’ voice, and instead just lives around it.

Plugged in this guitar has a similarly powerful sound to the CD-220SCE, but instead of the darker tone of spruce, the 230SCE has the nice, strident midrange focused tone of cedar, which is great when playing with a band, as it avoids the frequency ranges of the lows of the bass, and the highs of the cymbals, allowing the guitar to cut through the mix with ease. The comfortable neck profile is great for playing lead lines, and the added body in the mix that cedar provides definitely helps fill out the sound, and make your acoustic playing really pop. For its more full bodied tone in comparison to the CD-220, but still retaining the comfortable feel and style, the Fender CD-230SCE earns itself a solid 9 out of 10.

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World Music Supply | Hamer Guitars

Hey guys, it’s Brian here with World Music Supply again, to bring you another dose of gear and guitar reviews, and today I am pleased to bring you some more tasty treats from our good friends over at Hamer. As I’ve mentioned before, Hamer guitars was founded by three guys in Illinois during the early half of the 1970s, all united by their shared love of vintage instruments. They all worked to revive the craft of guitar making in a time when the art of making guitars had fallen to the lowest point it has ever been in electric guitar history. So for today’s review, I want to take some time and look at three finely crafted guitars all crafted with the same love for fine guitars that made Hamer so famous all those years ago.

Hamer SATP90-GT Arched Gold Top Electric Guitar

Hamer SATP90-GT Arched Gold Top Electric Guitar

First up on that list of finely crafted guitars is the SATP90-GT, which is a classic double cut design, with a vintage styled gold top body and two Hamer designed Soapbar style P-90s. The SATP90 has a lot of very vintage style to it, with a body that conjures up the classic double cut LP shape that is so iconic, but with a style and craftsmanship that can only come from Hamer. The body features a nicely carved maple top, which is always smooth and comfortable, and covered in that vintage gold top finish that is so endearing. All of that is mated to the Mahogany body, and that is fitted with a set mahogany neck which is just about the perfect size, not too big that it’s too hard to play lead, and not so thin that it’s uncomfortable to chord on.

Plugged in, this guitar has a sound that is about as vintage sounding as possible. The P-90 pickups have a plenty of bite to them, but never sacrificing the body that you would expect from a guitar like this. Clean this guitar has all of the sounds you expect out of a double P-90 guitar, with plenty of fat single coil tones, but with the added body and resonance of a maple topped mahogany body. The sparkle and jangle of the P-90s is always something that you really have to play to understand, as the added girth that a P-90 adds to that sparkle that you get from a single coil is really amazing. The neck pickup had a very acoustic sounding speaking voice as well, but with a slightly warmer tone than you would expect from say, a tele in the same position.

Running into a dirty amp however proves this to be a very different beast, suddenly this guitars real voice really starts to show itself, having the added body of a p-90, the chunk and power that you can drag out of this guitar is impressive to say the least. Suddenly I was able to get thick singing sustain, and big, bouncing rhythms, the added output of a P-90 really does wonders for an overdriven amp, as it just adds so many extra harmonics than a standard strat style single coil, or a typical humbucker.  It’s because of this ability to do everything from the most sparkling of cleans, to the raunchiest distortion that the SATP90-GT earns a respectable 9 out of 10, simply because I know the vintage vibe won’t float everyone’s boat.

Hamer SFX2-BK Electric Guitar Black

Hamer SFX2-BK Electric Guitar Black

Next up on the block is the SFX2-BK, which is a variation on the double cut design just like the SATP90-GT was, except this time, they’ve replaced the standard maple topped mahogany body and mahogany neck, for a basswood body, and a maple neck. This does a lot to the tone of the instrument, first and foremost being, Basswood has a much different sound than mahogany with a much more focused midrange, with a  softened high end response, and a much tighter bass response than its mahogany cousin. The maple neck, while sharing a similar shape to the SATP-90’s neck, has a vastly different tone. Maple imparts a snappy and almost twangy feeling to notes, while mahogany tends to have a much warmer, softer attack. Add to that the set of hot Hamer designed humbuckers and you start to get the picture that the SFX2 is a much more focused sounding guitar.

This becomes readily apparent when plugged into an amp. The SFX2 has a much dryer, more funky sound than the SATP-90, which had an almost acoustic tone. The tone of the SFX2 was more akin to what you assume an electric guitar will sound like clean, with very jazzy clean sounds, as opposed to acoustic sounding, which is actually pretty cool. The sound was warm, with just enough bite to really cut through the mix. The basswood really did lend something nice to the two Hamer humbuckers as they had a very modern sound, with plenty of snap and jangle, albeit with a very electric voice. The bridge pickup was nice and full without being overly bright, with just enough snap to really do what a bridge pickup needs to do, and the neck pickup was dark and jazzy, without being so dark that it becomes bland and droning.

Switching to a dirtier setting, the SFX2 suddenly had a very modern rock sound. Basswood has been a favorite for making super strat style guitars since the mid to late 80s as it adds a lot of mids, which Floyd Rose tremolos tend to lack, but on a guitar like this which is already rather mid heavy, the basswood gives it a lot of cut, and power without over doing it. This translated to rock tones that were clear, and present in the mix, without dominating the mix, which makes it great for rhythm guitar tracks, or leads that don’t need to be super in your face. The maple neck added a nice little twang to the sound, which was helpful at keeping the sound ever present in the mix, and keeping it from getting muddy. Overall the SFX2-Bk is a great guitar, with plenty of modern tones, and vintage style vibe, and it’s great for a guitarist who wants to keep one foot in the past, and one in the future, it’s for that do it all attitude that the SFX2-Bk gets itself a nice 9 out of 10.

Hamer STD-CS Standard Set Neck Flamed Top Electric Guitar Cherry Burst

Hamer STD-CS Standard Set Neck Flamed Top Electric Guitar Cherry Burst

Last up on today’s blog, is the STD-CS which is one of the shapes that made Hamer famous. The STD-CS is a stunning looking guitar, with its flamed maple top, mated to an alder body. Alder has a warm sound, with a deep, and tight low end, this makes for a really full sounding guitar when it’s mated to the maple top, and set maple neck. The combination of the sparkling highs that are added by the maple top, and the warm and distinct sound you get from alder is rather unusual, but it works for this guitar as the added density and mass of the body also create long, long sustain.

Plugging in the STD-CS, the raw power of this guitar immediately makes itself apparent. The clean tones, supplied by the duncan designed humbuckers, are big, and bold, as subtlety isn’t really this guitars forte. Chords are big, and in your face with a  power that a clean guitar tone doesn’t tend to have, lead lines are glassy and smooth, and running through a few U2 tunes with this guitar was just awesome. The tones are all there, but this guitars strange combo of maple and alder result in a guitar that has sustain for days, on top of having a very distinct sound.

Playing through an overdriven channel however was a treat. This guitar has a fullness and body to its tone that is familiar and foreign at the same time, as the sound of alder and maple really is a little different than the standard mahogany and maple in a number of ways, especially when overdriven. While they have a similar speaking voice, the feel of the sustain, and the way the guitar articulates the midrange and low end is a lot tighter than normal, this resulted in far more punch in a mix, which is always nice to have. The guitar was a joy to play, and the neck was that same near perfect shape, making shredding simple, and chords comfortable. The STD-CS is a gem of a guitar, with tones from the cleanest of shimmering cleans, and distorted barks that can run with even the biggest of names, and its for that power that this guitar gets a solid 10 out of 10.

World Music Supply | Takamine Guitars

Hey guys it’s Brian here with World Music Supply again, I hope you guys had a fun forth of July, and for our international readers, I hope you all had a great Wednesday. Getting down to business, today I’m here to talk about some fantastic acoustics made by our friends over at Takamine.  Takamine was founded in 1962 in Sakashita Japan, first as a small family business crafting well made acoustic guitars, which were a rarity in Japan at that point in time. By the mid 70’s they were one of the first manufactures of Acoustic-Electric guitars, and were subsequent pioneers in the art of pre-amp and equalizer technologies. Takamine is still revered in the acoustic guitar world, for their fine crafted and reasonably priced guitars.

Today I want to talk to you about two of these instruments, specifically the EG450SMCSB, and the EG540DLX. Both of these are fine acoustic guitars, each with their own specific voices and characters, so without further ado, lets dive right in. First up is the EG450SMCSB, here after simply referred to as the EG450. The EG450 features one of Takamines signature body shapes, the NEX which is sort of like a scaled down jumbo, with similar body woods and construction, but not as petite as say a typical mini-jumbo. The EG450 features flamed maple back and sides and a solid spruce top, as well as Takamines TP-4T pre-amp.

The Takamine EG450SMCSB

The Takamine EG450SMCSB

I tested the EG450 by itself and then with a band, just to see how it dealt with a more “live” situation. By itself, with no amplification, the EG450 features a very big speaking voice, with plenty of body thanks to its shape and size, and more then enough snap and twang thanks to the maple back and sides. Playing the EG450 finger style was no problem as the strings are spaced out enough that it’s never uncomfortable to play, but they aren’t spaced so far apart that it feels like you’re playing a classical guitar. The design is supposed to lend itself well to singers, as it leaves plenty of room for vocals, which it really does well.  This guitar really does feel like it was tailor made to sing with, because of its deep bass and snappy treble, it leaves a lot of room in the middle for vocals to fill up, without the guitar ever seeming thin, and without the guitar ever overpowering the singer.

Plugging the EG450 into a P.A and playing with my band proved a fun experiment, as the guitar dealt with volume surprisingly well. Anyone who has ever stepped onstage with a standard acoustic guitar knows that it is like walking into a sonic minefield, at any moment the guitar could just erupt into a harmonic frenzy. The EG450 seemed to cope with it far better then most, this I think had a lot to do with its body woods, as maple is a stiffer tone wood, meaning its harder to cause that annoying harmonic feedback. The guitar did get a little squirrelly at higher volumes, but for practice or a smaller gig, it wouldn’t really need a sound-hole cover. The tone through a Acoustic amp, or a P.A. is pretty amazing, it’s got all of the snap and sizzle that you’ve come to expect from piezo equipped acoustics, but thanks to the TP-4T pre-amp the sound still has plenty of body and power even through a moderately expensive amplifier.

Over all the EG450 is a very amazing guitar, and there aren’t many rivals in its particular price bracket. Because it really does sound nice through a P.A, and it would deal with both live and studio situations like a champ, the EG450SMCSB receives a solid 9 out of 10.  

The Takamine EG540DLX

The Takamine EG540DLX

Next in the line up is the EG540DLX which features Sepele back and sides. Sepele has often been branded as “African Mahogany” or some other fun marketing name aimed at people who are attracted to the more traditional tone woods, like big leaf mahogany or the many different species of maple that have found their way into the guitar world. The truth of it is Sepele is a close relative of mahogany, and as the price of traditional big leaf mahogany is sky rocketing, and the public is beginning to be more aware, and more accepting of exotic tone woods in their guitars, Sepele has taken its rightful place next to Koa, Cocobolo and Ovangkol. Thanks to its mahogany like tonal characteristics, the EG540 sounds amazingly like guitars that cost at least twice as much. I tested the EG540 the same way I did the EG450, alone, and then electrified with a band.

By itself the EG540 definitely sounds like a guitar costing at least a grand or so, with a big bold bottom end, sweet singing midrange, and a nice treble zing that never felt thin or tinny. The EG540 lent itself well to finger style playing as it filled the tonal spectrum amazingly well, with plenty of body and structure to its sound, strummed it sounded harmonically complex and dense, which is a great feeling when you need a guitar that really fills out the areas around a singers voice. With a band the EG540 was suited about as well as the EG450, it did need a sound hole cover slightly sooner then the EG450, as its body is a little more harmonically responsive then its maple bodied cousin. The EG540 features Takamines TK40 pre-amp which features a handy notch filter as well as all the typical features of a pre-amp (tuner, bass, middle and treble, gain control). The inclusion of a notch filter means that the EG540 is a handy feature, but once I had put the sound-hole cover in the guitar didn’t seem to have any more problems.

Amplified the guitar had a nice warm sound, with a fat bottom end, a bite-y mid range, and a nice fizzy high end that never sounded plasticy or metallic. It filled its respective role in the band very well, letting me fill out a lot of frequencies without ever stepping on anyone’s sonic toes, so to speak. I loved that the EG540 can be as cheap as a mid range guitar, sound like a fortune and let me know that I’m playing a guitar that isn’t ruining the planet, so to speak, and its because of this that the EG540DLX receives a deserved 10 out of 10.

So there you have it, two great guitars, both at an amazing price. Both of them are equally at home on stage or in the studio, and each looks and feels like a guitar that costs easily twice as much. So why don’t you hurry and get one while supplies last, right now at Worldmusicsupply.com!

World Music Supply | Washburn Acoustics

Hey guys it’s Brian Here with World Music Supply, and today I’m here to talk to you about some amazing acoustics from Washburn Guitars.  For years Washburn has been making fantastic sounding guitars, at even more fantastic prices. These guitars are no exception, with tone and playability that is on par with, or even above guitars costing five to ten times as much.

The Washburn WD16S

The Washburn WD16S

First up in this review is the WD16S, a stunning dreadnought acoustic that is part of Washburn’s heritage series. Featuring a solid cedar top, and mahogany back and sides, this guitar is comprised of some of the most sought after tone woods around. Helping to offset the “plain Jane” appearance of the WD16S is a stunning abalone rosette and matching binding.

Sitting down with the WD16S was a nice experience, as it embodied everything that the dreadnought is supposed to possess. With big, full sounds, with just the right mix of bass and treble, this guitar sounded just right. It has that specific tone that singer songwriters are just drawn to, with all of the boldness to support your voice, but never overwhelming it. Micing the guitar with an Audio Technica AT2020, this guitar yielded big bottom end chunk with high, chimy jangle that was perfect for everything from using as a rhythm track along side a band, or even just paired with a voice.

My Favorite part about the WD16S, and indeed any dreadnought, is just how versatile they are, covering everything from soft finger picking, to hard strumming, even just playing some chords while you sing, this guitar has the sound that just suits any situation. The WD16S is a beautiful guitar, with an amazing sound; my favorite part however is the feel of it. The dreadnought body shape fits you like an old friend, and the neck feels comfortable, with no rough edges, or dead spots. The WD16S is a great guitar, at an astounding price, with a tone that is far beyond anything in its price range. I give the WD16S a 9 out of 10, mainly because, while yes it is a fantastic guitar, it is a little plain looking.

The Washburn WG25S

The Washburn WG25S

Next up to bat, is the WG25S, an amazing Grand Auditorium style guitar, which features a solid Alaskan Sitka Spuce top, and Rosewood back and sides. I personally have always loved Grand Auditoriums, mainly because one of my favorite guitarists, Don Ross, uses one live so frequently. They have a nice big, illustrious sound, which is great for solo guitarists.

Putting the WG25S through its paces, I was amazed at how tight and punchy it sounded, it always had a big tone, with plenty of bass on tap, but when you really threw yourself at it, it had all the snap and swagger of a much smaller guitar. This is a trait that I have only ever experienced with Grand Auditoriums, they have almost as much big, bold tone as a jumbo, and all the versatility of a Dreadnought, but they also have this unique warm, round tone, that no matter how snappy and fast you play, never goes away.

Playing fingerstyle on the WG25S was always comfortable, and the extra body size never felt overbearing or cumbersome. The neck was fast, and leant itself to fast playing quite well. Overall, I love the WG25S, as it has everything I could ever want from an acoustic guitar, with all of the boldness of a big jumbo, and all of the soulfulness of a much smaller guitar. At the end of the day the WG25S gets a 10 out of 10, because of how much guitar you get, for so little money.

The Washburn WMJ40SCE

The Washburn WMJ40SCE

Last up in this review is the WMJ40SCE a fascinating little Mini Jumbo style guitar, which is somewhere between a Jumbo and a Parlor guitar in tonality, as it uses the brighter tone woods of the Jumbo family, and features a smaller, more focused frequency spectrum of a parlor style guitar. This also is the only Electric-Acoustic in todays review. Playing through some songs with my band, I found that the WMJ40SCE filled out its required range very well.

If you have ever played acoustic guitar live, you know that acoustic guitars tend to play devils advocate most of the time, and either be nearly inaudible over the sonic architecture of a band, or end up a screaming mass of strings and wood. The WMJ40SCE however features rather bright sounding tone woods, flamed maple in particular, this means that it has a much lower bass response than many, and as such, it responds to bass frequencies less than many other guitars. This means you have less frequencies to play havoc with your sound, and once a sound hole cover is added, this guitar sounds almost exactly as it does un-amplified, which is down right amazing.

The WMJ40SCE sounded great with my band, never too thin sounding, but never to overpowering in the bass range to interfere with my bass players duties. It was percussive enough that it complemented the drummer nicely, and snappy enough that when I took a turn playing some mellow lead parts it always pulled through and was easily heard over the mix. The WMJ40SCE also felt very comfortable, with its mini jumbo body feeling a lot like a dreadnought, just with a far more rounded profile. I loved getting to test run the WMJ40SCE, with its bright, yet warm tones and its little body with the flamed maple back and sides. For its ability to hold its own with a band, even in a really high volume situation without a sound hole cover, I give the WMJ40SCE a well deserved 10 our of 10.

so there you have it folks, some great acoustics at a great value, with all of these fantastic guitars at such awesome prices, it is hard to choose, but maybe now that you have a better idea of which guitar is suited for what, you can head on over to Worldmusicsupply.com today, and pick up your very own Washburn Acoustic today!

Washburn

Washburn

World Music Supply | Washburn Guitars

Hey guys its Brian from World Music Supply here again, and today I’m here to talk to you about some great guitars from Washburn. Washburn has always been known for making fantastic guitars, at bargain basement prices, and these are no exception. These guitars all sound, and play like instruments that cost three or four times as much.

The Washburn WIN14FVSB

The Washburn WIN14FVSB

Lets start with the WIN14FVSB, a nice single cut style guitar. The WIN14FVSB fits you like an old friend, it just feels right. The WIN14FVSB has a classic tobacco burst finish, with a basswood body, a bolt on maple neck with a nice carved cutaway, making it easier for your hand to slide up to the top of the neck. The power of the WIN14FVSB comes from the Washburn designed humbuckers, the sound of them is quite meaty, and musical. It filled out lead lines well, with thick harmonic sustain, and when I sat back and just strummed some chords, it was bright and resilient sounding, almost kind of twangy when in the bridge position, and in the neck position it sounded nice and round with all of the body and warmth you would expect. The control layout is slightly rearranged then a standard singlecut guitar, which is nice, because it makes doing pinky volume swells a lot easier. Overall I really like the WIN14FVSB, probably because I’ve always loved double humbucker guitars with basswood bodies, I give the WIN14FVSB a 9 out of 10, because I know people usually want a set neck on a guitar like this, but I love this guitar nonetheless.

The Washburn WINSTDCB

The Washburn WINSTDCB

Then lets move onto the WINSTDCB, which is a lot more typical of what you expect in a guitar this shape, carved mahogany body, maple top, and a bound body and neck. However you also get the extended relief neck joint, which makes it easier to slide up the higher frets, it also features a graphtech graphite nut, meaning the tuning on this guitar is a lot more stable than your average guitar. The WINSTDCB sounds big and fat, with more than enough sustain on tap for anyone, it has that classic sound that you can only get from a guitar like this.

Seymour Duncan USM

Seymour Duncan USM

The WINSTDCB also features Seymour Duncan USM humbuckers, which sound amazing, running it through a slightly overdriven tube amp I got plenty of classic blues rock style leads, with that nice fluid tone, that kind of sound that just soars when you bend it up just right.

The Washburn WINSTDCB

The Washburn WINSTDCB

Adding in some more gain, I got some serious chunk, with enough punch so it never got muddy. Later on, I dropped the tuning a step or so, and the WINSTDCB just growled and grinded through some chunky metal riffs, I personally love how versatile guitars like this are, it has all the right sounds for all the right situations, from bone dry jazz licks, to searing metal riffing, the WINSTDCB has it all. I give it a 9 out of 10, only because just like most LP style guitars, the WINSTDCB is a little on the heavy side, but it’s thanks to that weight that the WINSTDCB sustains as well as it does.

Lastly there is the WINSTDLITEG, a classic gold top style guitar, with a slimmer LITE style body. The guitar is a bit thinner than the other two guitars in today’s round-up, which means it weighs a bit less, meaning the WINSTDLITEG is more comfortable if you have to carry it around all night.  The WINSTDLITEG features a smooth and rather comfortable feeling carved maple top, ontop of the mahogany body. The set mahogany neck features a nice slightly slimmer profile then the other two, its not too thick to where it feels awkward to play leads, but it’s not too thin to where it feels uncomfortable to play chords, and just like the other two, the WINSTDLITEG is comfortable enough to play for hours and hours. The WINSTDLITEG has the same searing tones as the WINSTDCB thanks to those Seymour Duncan USM Pickups, with the same versatility as the WINSTDCB, with tones that range from smooth, warm jazz licks, to shred runs, this guitar has all of the power to give you the tones you want. Overall the WINSTDLITEG feels comfortable, and its slimmer body meant I could keep playing it for hours without it ever feeling heavy. I give the WINSTDLITEG a 10 out of 10 easy, because it has all of the tonal power of the WINSTDCB in a unique slimmer style body.

The Washburn WINSTDLITEG

The Washburn WINSTDLITEG

The long and short of it is, these guitars are awesome. You get all of the classic LP style guitar tones, and at a fraction of the cost. So if you’re looking for a great guitar, at a fantastic price, why don’t you go and head on over to WorldMusicSupply, and look through our long list of Washburn guitars and pick yourself one up today!