WMS at NAMM 2016

Hey guy’s Brian here again with more promised info from NAMM, just covering some of the cool new stuff that we can expect to see in the year ahead from some of our friends. Let’s start off with Marshall, who came out swinging with their new Code amplifiers. They were designed as part of a collaboration between classic amp manufacturer Marshall and Next generation plug-in designers Softube as an “authentic modelling” of classic and contemporary Marshall tones via their new Marshall-Softube (MST) modelling, in addition to its banks and banks of high quality effects, CODE offers 14 preamps, four power amps and eight speaker cabinets. These include the JTM45 2245, 1962 Bluesbreaker, 1959SLP Plexi, JCM800 2203, JCM2555 Silver Jubilee, JCM2000 DSL100, JVM410H and more, while power amp voicings on offer are EL34, 5881, EL84 & 6L6 – there’s a selection of speaker cabs, too: 1960, 1960V, 1960AX, 1936V, 1912, 1974X and more. Also, just because I find it awesome, it’s also Bluetooth, so you can control certain aspects of it via your phone or tablet, send music to it, and even (so I’ve heard) control it via a Bluetooth foot controller!

marshall-code-970-80

Next let’s talk about Fender, now every year it seems like Fender is trying to top themselves in some way, and for the past few years that has been their custom shop offerings. This year they had a few that stood out to me, firstly is the Repeater Telecaster designed by Master Builder Yuriy Shishkov, that’s modeled after an 18th century watch

Fender Music Repeater Tele.jpg

And by far my favorite, because of my love for weird old esoteric Fender models, is the Katana, Fender’s shot at a hyper modern Metal guitar re-imagined by Custom Shop Master Builder Todd Krause.

Katana

oh and before I Forget it, we can’t forget the viral youtube sensation of CARDBOARD STRAT

Waller

So aside from their custom shop offerings what’ve we got to look forward to?

fender_7

Yes folks, you see that right, Telemasters!
…or as their calling them “offset telecasters”somehwat-mad-completely-mad-u-mad-madad1

now for those out of the loop, Telemasters are sort of this cool parts guitar blue print that a lot of indie manufacturers and amateur builders have been busying themselves with for years now, and sure Fender made one or two in the past as trade show talk pieces, and for the most part they were more Esquier than Tele, but this is still super cool! to see such an interesting blend of vintage and modern pulled off with such style, I love it. Oh and what’s that on the other end of the display? Are those Jazzmasters with proper jazz tailpieces? Yup, bigsby equipped jazzmasters, imitating one of the most popular mods to their hard tail jazzmasters, and at the same time pulling it off with a style that only Fender could, no extra switches or knobs, just a black pickguard, simple, subdued single tone finishes, very stylish, love it.

Lastly for Fender is the new American Elite Series, which is replacing the long running Deluxe line. I liked them, from what I’m hearing on their youtube videos they sound fantastic, and the smaller touches like the sort of rubberized knobs are cool too, everything looks vintage enough but still very modern. The new color options are modern too, and yet still feel like Fender, with new satin bursts, and light blue to dark blue bursts, as well as the return of that lovely Camaro Orange color they call Autumn Blaze Metallic, I loved that color about 4 or 5ish years ago when that was one of their regular colors, just so unusual for a guitar, flashy and yet still sorta normal.

0opener-fender-elite-neil-godwin-1200-80

All and all I loved what Fender is up to this year, and I can’t wait to actually get my hands on some of it!

NEXT UP
let’s take a deep dive into Charvel, who looks to be actually reissuing their pro mod San-Dimas and So-Cal series in some very exciting colors, clearly inspired by their 80’s aesthetic

12592198_10153619708296387_6808129386736037594_n
These look awesome, so retro and cool! I’m just happy to see that Charvel is starting to move out of the cookie cutter metal guitar scene, or at the very least peppering some color in there.  I would love for them to reissue the Style 2, because I haven’t seen a super tele in years! That being said, Charvel is shaping up to have some rad new stuff coming out that is sure to impress even the most discerning of players

12633572_10153619707986387_8150245247118979168_o

Lastly I want to talk about Washburn who had a TON of cool stuff going on at their booth this year, I wish I had more to say about it, but I feel like the pictures will speak for themselves, lets start with some new parallaxe models

12552603_1047494745271323_4424253473239808891_n

12573014_1047494755271322_7171318033763522790_n

To their new, rather Californian influenced, electrics

12552900_1047494785271319_3680244512685343232_n

And of course let’s not forget their acoustics, with new rather affordable new designs coming to their heritage range, as well as their woodline series, both of which are shaping up to be just beautiful (really sorry I don’t have a picture of them from the showroom floor)
WASHOWL

So there you have it guys, tons of cool new stuff coming this year in terms of gear, with lots to look forward too! and you bet as soon as I can get my hands on it, I’ll be reviewing it right here for you guys.

~Hoover

 

Advertisements

World Music Supply | DBZ Guitars

Hey guys, I know its been a long, long time, but Brian of the World Music Supply blog has made his return! I was finally able to move around things in my schedule to yet again reasonably accommodate the blog, so lets get down to business. I am here to today to talk about some awesome guitars we have right now from our good friends over at DBZ. We here at World Music Supply love DBZ Guitars. Its as simple as that. They are high quality guitars, made with high quality parts, with precision workmanship, what’s not to like?
DBZ BARFMPL-FR-NS Barchetta FM Plus Series Electric Guitar

First up on the block today are the Barchetta Plus FM Series, these guys are amazing. I’ve been a big fan of the Barchetta body style since I first saw them a year or so back, their sleek strat style body, with its futuristic carved top body, and the classic vibe of the 3×3 headstock. It all adds up to a very stunning looking guitar. Back in those days though, the only versions of this guitar that I had ever laid eyes on were red, black and gray. Don’t get me wrong, those guitars were beautiful, and they played like a dream, but these guitars though, with their abalone binding, deep flamed maple tops, and matching headstock, they’re just a whole other level.

now of course they still have all of the same appointments as their non flamed maple counterparts, the DBZ signature neck contour, the floyd rose, the DBZ signature pickups with a push pull knob, and that big metal badge on the headstock, all of it puts this guitar some where between a workhorse of a guitar, and a luxury art piece. Form and functionality in harmony.

DBZ BARFM-FR-TBK Barchetta FM Flamed Maple Top Electric Guitar

DBZ BARFM-FR-TBK Barchetta FM Flamed Maple Top Electric Guitar

Amplified, the flamed maple adds a tiny bit to the guitars overall tone, but the big difference in tone seems to come from the mahogany, as opposed to the alder bodies of the LT series I am so familiar with. The tone seemed to be a little thicker, with a much heavier lower midrange bark. Alder had a balanced and almost focused sound, but this guitar paired with its mahogany body and stunning flamed maple top, well… it really growls at you. Chording on it felt nice and smooth, with enough presence to make sure I was heard over even the most over the top of drummers, and single note lines had a ferocity to them, an attitude almost. Someone could make a career off of this guitar, carry it with them from day one, be the symbol their recognized for. That’s the kind of guitar this is, it’s a guitar that will leave an impression.

DBZ BARFMPL-FR-SF Barchetta FM Plus Series Electric Guitar

DBZ BARFMPL-FR-SF Barchetta FM Plus Series Electric Guitar

Overall score, easy 10 out of 10

Long time readers of the WMS Blog will know that when it comes to guitars I have two real weaknesses, Telecasters, and White Lespauls. I really don’t know why its these two guitar styles, but they’re really powerful to me. So when the DBZ Bolero Calavera made its way into the WMS offices I had to look at the thing. Just stare at it. Its just so flashy, with its stylized metal truss rod cover, the old DBZ signature tailpiece, and oh yea, the giant metal tramp stamp (that’s what they call it, not me) that’s anchored to the lower bout of the guitar.

DBZ BOLCAL-WH Bolero Calavera Series Single Cutaway Electric Guitar

DBZ BOLCAL-WH Bolero Calavera Series Single Cutaway Electric Guitar

Other than the unusual appointments at either end of the guitar, this is a fairly typical Bolero. Mahogany body, maple top, ebonized rosewood fretboard with 22 frets and their DBZB and DBZ5 Pickups. Their also given some cool Pearloid purfling around the body as well, which really makes this guitar stand out. It might feel like a normal Bolero, but when I was playing it felt so different, it was almost like the sheer attitude of the guitar, made it another guitar. Like when you listen to some really old classic rock, you know the guitarists really aren’t that good, but you can’t quit listening. Even though their entire education must have come from one or at the most two mel bay guitar method books, you’re just captured by that sheer attitude that is exuded from their guitar.

That’s how this guitar felt, I knew it sounded almost the same as the bolero, maybe a tiny, tiny bit different because of the chunks of metal on the guitar, but this guitar just made me want to play different. It made me really slam into the guitar, dig in with my pick. I was all power chords and grit, sure the clean sound is cool and jazzy, and the single note lines are fat and clear, but look at this thing, your likely never going to play a clean line on this guitar, and sure you might play a solo here and there, but most of the work on a guitar like this is going to be very power chord heavy.

I loved this guitar, if not for the fact that it is a fantastic guitar just like the standard Bolero, but also because of its really heavy attitude. It made me play different, act different, it made me really want to crank up my amp, make my neighbors angry. That’s what this guitar felt like, it felt like what we all thought Rock & Roll was when we were little kids.

Overall score 9 out of 10. Because even though it is almost perfect, it is for a certain kind of guitarist, and that isn’t everyone.

World Music Supply | ESP Ltd VIPER 256

Hey guys its Brian with World Music Supply here to bring you your usual dose of gear and guitar reviews. In today’s blog I got to check out some cool goodies from our friends over at ESP.  We here at WMS have a special place in our cumulative heart for ESP, they’re cool looking, they don’t cost an arm and a leg, and they sound great no matter what you throw at them, and when it comes to guitars you just cant do better than that. So lets get down to business with the center piece of today’s review, the Viper256.

ESP Ltd Viper 256 Electric Guitar See Thru Black Cherry

ESP Ltd Viper 256 Electric Guitar See Thru Black Cherry

The Viper256 comes in two rather attractive finishes, the see thru black cherry, and my personal favorite, black with gold hardware; you just can’t get classier than that. This guitar is a work horse, a solid chunk of Mahogany, 24 big easy playing frets on a fast Thin U shaped Mahogany neck, topped with a nice looking Ebony fretboard. The Tonepros TOM bridge is nice, straightforward, easy to intonate and get working. The part that I really loved about the 256 is the ESP designed LH-150 humbuckers, they have a bold sound with lots of midrange and lows, with just enough high end cut to get you through the mix, but not treble-y enough to cut your head off. The LH-150’s are also coil-tappable by pulling up on the tone-knob, which means you get rich, full sounding humbuckers, and with a flick of your wrist, you have sparkly, shimmering single coils, amazing.

ESP Ltd Viper 256 Electric Guitar Black

ESP Ltd Viper 256 Electric Guitar Black

Clean, this guitar sounded very big, it really has a ton of low end body to it, which I love in a guitar, the mids were thick, and really filled out the area you would expect a guitar to, and the highs were just cutting enough to really sculpt the sound out, not too bright, it left enough room for a band, but more than filled out all of the area a guitar should. With the single coils engaged, you of course notice a tiny drop in volume which I compensated for with a little help from my Electro Harmonix LPB-1. The tone was slinky, it had a lot of Tele style tones to it, but without the high end twang you typically get from a Fender scale length, bolt neck guitar. This meant it had a lot of jangly, almost acoustic sounding vibe, and I really dug the funky kind of bite I could get out of it.

Distorted, this guitar was down right animalistic! The distorted growl of the bridge pickup was very rich, and had a great lead and rhythm tone to it, without having to fiddle with the tone or volume knobs, and I didn’t even have to mess around with any pedals, the bridge pickup was so balanced sounding that it just did everything. The middle position was a tad bit more tame sounding, with a warmer low end, and a little less high end cut, and the neck position had very warm, very bluesy tones hidden in it. Shred work was easy, the shorter 24.75 scale length and the big frets on an ebony board made this guy super fast. The single coil tone had quite a bit of vibe to it; it had that clarity of a single coil with a lot less hum, and not as much treble response. I personally loved this guitar, it looks cool, it feels nice, it plays great, and the sounds it made were pure rock star. I would have to be crazy to not award the Viper 250 a solid 10 out of 10.

World Music Supply | ESP Guitars

Hey guys, it’s Brian from World Music Supply again, bringing your usual dose of gear and guitar reviews. Today I get to bring you a few gems from our friends over at ESP, what I love about ESP and LTD guitars are just how lead friendly they are. As someone who grew up playing metal guitar, and even though I have transitioned away from that style of playing and into less labor intensive styles of music, I still love the feel of a guitar with a thin neck, and nearly flat radius, and when it comes to big, thick metal lead tones, ESP has always been my go to brand. So think of the theme of today, as guitars crafted for metal, but with enough stylistic wiggle room to fit in well enough almost anywhere.

ESP Ltd M103FM See-Thru Black

ESP Ltd M103FM See-Thru Black

First up on the list for today is the M103FM-STBK, which is part of their Mirage series of guitars, which are your rather typical Super Strat affair. Shred friendly necks, nice flattened radius, bold sounding pickups, and of course that perfectly setup Floyd Rose Special tremolo. The LH-150 humbucking bridge pickup had a wonderfully full sound, with a rather nice low end to it, which is something I always look for in a bridge pickup, the LS-120 middle and neck pickups had a nice clarity to them, but still had a very full sound, more so than you typically find in single coil pickups.

To play this guitar is a thing of beauty, the neck is lighting fast, and the combination of a maple fretboard and a trans black flamed maple top is a true thing of beauty. The feel of the neck is perfect for those who need to play fast, with big tall frets, and a nice flattened out radius, not to mention the delivering big bends with the Floyd Rose. Clean this translates to a guitar that has a all of the spank and sparkle that you expect of a strat, but when you crank up the distortion this guitar becomes a thing of power! With fiery rhythm tones, that have all of the weight and girth you could ever need, and with enough punchy lead sounds, or if you switch to the neck pickup, glassy lead sounds to keep your lead work sounding fresh for years.

so what is the M103FM-STBK? Well to put it briefly, it’s a workhorse. This guitar has all of the tones you could ever need, a Floyd Rose, and a neck that is perfect for shred friendly guitarists, all at a price point that is more than accessible to the beginning metal guitarist, and this is why the M103FM-STBK earns itself a solid 10 out of 10.

EC1000FR-STBLK

EC1000FR-STBLK

Next up is something a little less conventional than a super strat, a super LP, the EC1000FR-STBLK. This isn’t your average LP, this guitar comes armed to the teeth with all the appointments of a modern metal machine. Covered in a trans black flamed maple top, with plenty of abalone appointments, and not to mention the delicious black nickel hardware and the really cool Earvana Compensated Nut.

First off, this guitar does still carry a lot of the already amazing specifications of a standard LP, Mahogany body, Flamed Maple top, nice Thin U Mahogany Neck, but this guitar is definitely hotrodded. This all starts with the 24 fret neck, with 24 big XJ sized frets which are just great for lighting fast legato runs. You also get an amazing set of EMG pickups, with an 80 in the bridge, and a 60 in the neck. These pickups have a very big, full tone to them, with plenty of smooth clean signal, and enough output to drive even the heaviest of metal. Next you get the obvious addition of the black nickel Floyd Rose 1000 tremolo, with an Earvana compensated locking nut.

My understanding of the Earvana system is it slightly offsets the scale length of each string to help keep each string in tune better, and help eliminate the inherent intonation issues of the guitar. What this translated to, while subtle, was an ability to play in tune perfectly next to very unforgiving instruments. What I mean by this, is when you are a guitarist who only plays with other guitarists, if you’re slightly out of tune, its not too easy to notice, as it almost creates a chorusing or doubling effect, which your brain will translate as musical rather than an out of tune note. But, if you’re like me, and often play guitar next to a synthesizer, you know that if you are out of tune, you can’t try and hide it, because the keyboard can’t really be slightly sharp or flat, and your guitar can be.  

With these kinds of appointments, you would expect this guitar to play like a dream, and you would not be disappointed. The neck was perfect, thin and quick enough for super fast lead work, but still with enough meat left on it that I didn’t feel weird playing chords on it. The Earvana nut was a subtle improvement, but it made playing chords sound just a little bit sweeter, and when I played next to a keyboard on a synth pad, I noticed my guitar sounded a little more “on” than usual, almost like there were more riffs that worked with the chord than usual. All of my lead work sounded a little more alive too, thanks to the EMGs distinctive sound, and I wanted to keep playing longer, just because this guitar is so cool to look at, I just didn’t want to put it down.

At the end of the day, what more could you ask for? This guitar is everything you love about a standard LP, but with a dozen or so amazing additions to it’s already genius design that make it so much more to cherish. For the simple fact that they took one of the greatest designs for a guitar in history, and turned it up to 11, the EC1000FR-STBLK earns itself a solid 10 out of 10.

World Music Supply | Marshall DSL Amplifiers

Hey guys, it’s Brian from World Music Supply here again, to bring you another dose of gear and guitar reviews. Today though, I have an awesome treat, I get to review the Marshall DSL series of all tube amplifiers.  Surprisingly, this is the first Marshall I have had the privilege to actually review, a fact that I hope to rectify in the coming months. Regardless, the DSL stands for Double Super Lead, because the amp is based around a two channel design. All of the amps in the line have the same overall design and a similar sound, with the only noticeable difference from amp to amp is volume and headroom, as well as the controls layout.

The Marshall DSL15H 15 Watt All Tube Amplifier Head

The Marshall DSL15H 15 Watt All Tube Amplifier Head

First up on the block today is the 15 Watt head, which is also available in a combo which is equipped with a Celestion 12” speaker. The 15 watt DSL is laid out like the other amplifiers in the family, with a classic gain, an ultra gain, a mid shift button which contours the mids for a much more metal friendly setting, and a deep button, which shifts the resonance frequency to boost the bass up. The amp is also equipped with a Pentode/Triode switch that drops the power down to 7.5 watts as well as shifting the tone to a smoother less aggressive styled sound.

The Marshall DSL15C 15 Watt All Tube Combo Amplifier

The Marshall DSL15C 15 Watt All Tube Combo Amplifier

The first thing that needs to be mentioned, is this amp is plenty loud, but I could so see the point behind an amp like this in the studio, as you can crank it, and get that classic Marshall on the brink sound, without being evicted or going deaf. The sound does have everything a great Marshall should have, that great Nashville style clean tone, with just a bit of an edge to help you cut out above the band, a crunch AC/DC style sound, and switching to the Ultra gain side of the amp, you get everything from late 80s hair metal gain, all the way up to mid 90s angry at the world style gain. All of the settings are very, very usable, and voice perfectly for what they are designed for, the classic side ranges from the aforementioned Nashville style clean, and right up to what you recognize as the Marshall sound of the late 70s, with tons of bottom end, mid range cut, and all of the harmonic glory that cemented the Marshall name into the fabric of history.

The Ultra side, is much more aimed at really hard rock, and metal players, as the levels of gain are amazingly high, it is great as a lead boost for solos, and as a rhythm channel for a metal guitarist, as with the tone switch engaged, the mid range chunk that this channel has is perfect for big, brutal rhythm, and just devistating when you play big down tuned chords.

The Marshall DSL40C 40 Watt All Tube Combo Amplifier

The Marshall DSL40C 40 Watt All Tube Combo Amplifier

Next up is the 40 Watt combo version of the DSL, which incorporates all of the features of the 100 watt head, into a 40 watt package you could fit in the trunk of your car. The two channels now are split, with a clean/crunch switch on the classic channel, and a lead one and lead two switch on the ultra channel. There is also an expanded EQ with a presence and resonance control taking over for the bass shift button, as well as two different types of reverb on hand.

The division between the channels was cool, and being able to switch from clean to AC/DC style crunch to a metal lead tone was pretty cool. The division of the ultra channel made for an interesting conundrum as I loved everything about the ultra on the 15 watt version, but now being able to switch from that metal grind tone I got before over to an equally amazing Lead two was just great for down tuned glory. It was hard to choose which side of the Lead section I liked more, but the one part that floored me was, it really isn’t all that noisy, you still might need a noise gate, but compared to many other high gain amplifiers, there really isn’t all that much hiss.

The Marshall DSL100H 100 Watt All Tube Amplifier Head

The Marshall DSL100H 100 Watt All Tube Amplifier Head

Finally there is the matter of the 100watt head, which took everything I liked about the 40 Watt version and pumped it up a lot.  What I love about this head though is that it is everything a Marshall should be, versatile, dramatic, roadworthy and loud! As with any 100 Watt amp, you have to handle them with a certain amount of care, as they are amazingly loud, I was able to keep the clean channel clean no matter how loud I turned up, well I should say, as loud as my ear drums would let me turn up. The Crunch channel had a lot more boom to it when it was pushed through a 4×12, and likewise the lead channels had a lot more thump to them, and by that I mean you get a lot more of that punched in the chest feeling when they are coming at you from a Marshall 4×12 cabinet.

All in all , the DSL series are some of the best Marshalls I’ve ever gotten to play through, with a liveliness to them, and a brashness about them that reminds me of the amps of yesteryear, but at the same time retaining all of the power tube punch you need to play modern metal. For all of these reasons the entire DSL family scores a well earned 10 out of 10.

World Music Supply | Washburn Electrics

Hey guys, Brian with World Music Supply here to bring you some much needed guitar and gear reviews for the weekend. This Saturday I got the chance to review two guitars that just came into the warehouse from our friends over at Washburn. One of the things we love about Washburn, is they cater to every price bracket, and every genre of guitarist, from Metal to country, from acoustics for singer songwriters to jazz cats with their arch top hollow bodies. Today I get to sample some of these instruments, one that is universal, one that is a little less…traditional. First up, let’s start off with that more universal guitar, the Washburn WINSTDWH.

The Washburn WINSTDWH Idol WIN Standard Series Electric Guitar

The Washburn WINSTDWH Idol WIN Standard Series Electric Guitar

I used the term “universal” for a reason, the single cutaway, mahogany body with maple top, and two humbuckers is a real universal combination. Worn on stages around the world by everyone from metal guitarists, who love the huge sound of the two hot humbuckers, to country guitarists who like its more conservative look, and its bright twangy tones, this guitar really has a universally loved design, and an equally loved sound. I picked the white finish, as I personally just love white Les Paul style guitars; call it a hold over from my teenage years of idolizing Randy Rhoads. The WINSTDWH comes pretty well armed when it comes to everything from tonewoods to it’s Duncan USM Alnico 5 pickups, and over all they make this guitar sound just amazing.

Running clean this guitar has a bright and strident tone, with lots of girth and body. The neck feels super comfortable, with plenty of body to it, so it didn’t feel super modern, but thin enough that you can still play fast without too much extra effort. The bridge pickup was a tad bright, with a warm vintage character. The neck humbucker is warm and fat sounding, without sounding muddy or bass heavy. The different control layout of the volume and tone controls makes doing pinky volume swells far easier than with the typical volume and tone layout, which is something I have had a problem with for years.

Running into a dirty amp, this guitar sounds massive! The sustain is fantastic thanks to its proven tone woods and set neck design, and the Alnico 5 pickups are hot, with a searing quality to them that is just delightful. I was able to coax everything out of this guitar, from classic 70’s style blues rock, to down tuned metal, to good old rock and roll grind. The sound is distinct, but familiar, with a sound that is both old and new. That’s what I love about this style of guitar, every generation has re-invented it, taken it in a new direction, and made it their own. You can play rock on it, metal, country, heck even jazz, this guy really does everything! You just cant go wrong with this guy, and that’s why the WINSTDWH earns itself a solid 10 out of 10.

The Washburn PS7000-HBK PAUL STANLEY Electric Guitar

The Washburn PS7000-HBK PAUL STANLEY Electric Guitar

Next up, is the Paul Stanley PS7000 series, and in today’s review specifically, the PS7000HBK. I labeled this guitar as untraditional earlier in the blog, and there is a definite reason why. From its weird drooping lower cutaway, its upper bout that looks far different than most, and its over all asymmetrical design, the PS7000 might look like a typical les paul from far away, up close it looks like one, but only in the surrealist sense of the word.  

As weird as this guitar might look, it sounds down right awesome. The clean tones are deep and rich, with perfect intonation all across the neck thanks to the inclusion of the Buzz Feiten tuning system. The action was smooth and clean, and try as I might I couldn’t find any lick that didn’t sound awesome on this guitar. All of the KISS songs I know also sounded just perfect on this guitar, as the tone was clearly designed from the ground up to compliment them.

Dirty, this guitar was a treat. The warm characteristic it leant to the overdriven amp was just to die for, it felt vintage, but it looks like it came from outer space. The sustain was tremendous, lasting on and on with a warm vocal quality. Overall this guitar is a great addition to the growing Paul Stanley family of Washburn guitars, and a great LP style guitar for anyone who wants one, but doesn’t want to look like everyone else. For its unusual looks, and super powered sounds, the PS7000HBK scores itself a solid 10 out of 10.

World Music Supply | Boss Distortion Pedals

Hi guys, Brian from World Music Supply here to talk to you guys about some cool, classic pedals from our friends over at Boss. I picked to do a basic run through of their Distortion pedals, as their line is possibly the most iconic in the industry, as many of us started our pedal boards with one of their little fuzz boxes. For the better part of thirty five years, Boss has been building and designing inexpensive, great sounding stomp boxes, that have shaped the sounds of millions of guitarists world wide. It could be argued that their most iconic was the DS1, our first pedal in today’s review.

The Boss DS1 Distortion Guitar Pedal

The Boss DS1 Distortion Guitar Pedal

The Boss DS1 came along at a time when effect pedals just didn’t play as great a role as they do today, sure people could buy a few little boxes, but these were often bulky, battery powered, and often broke down. This in large part was due to the lesser availability of compact circuitry, electrical know how, and quality of components that were available over all. My favorite example of this haphazard approach to guitar effects, is by far the DeArmond Trem-Trol, which used a small canister of mercury that would swish back and forth while the canister rotated, to create a very primitive tremolo effect. Sure it got the job done, but by todays standards, this sounds down right barbaric. In comes Boss, with their simple straight forward design, tiny little pedals, and amazing sounds.

The DS-1 has a very distinctive sound, with a lot of cut, grind, and a slight fizziness to it that helps lift it up and out of the mix. This pedal can do everything from classic rock grunt, with an almost KISS like edge to them, backing the controls back a bit, you would not be surprised at all that Joe Satriani used to use one of these as his primary means of distortion. The cool little yellow pedal doesn’t have a ton of versatility, it really was designed to take the place of the overdrive channel on an amp, taking a single channel amp, and allowing it to overdrive at much lower volumes. But that doesn’t matter, the DS-1 is Iconic, with a sound that has shaped literally millions of guitarists world wide, and you can’t allow this pedals lack of versatility to stand in the way of its massive, iconic sound. The DS-1 gets a solid 10 out of 10, because without it, who knows what modern rock would sound like.

The Boss SD1B Super Overdrive Guitar Pedal

The Boss SD1B Super Overdrive Guitar Pedal

Next up is the SD-1B the Super Overdrive, which is a warmer, more realistic sounding alternative to the DS-1 which more accurately emulates the sound of an overdriven tube amp. The tone is smooth and warm, with a slight graininess to it that really makes it feel like you really are playing an amp that is just grinding apart at the seams. The SD-1B, while not as iconic as the DS-1, certainly has its own place in the guitar pedal history books, listening to its classic rock style tones, with its simple, but far more versatile controls when compared to the DS-1. The tone of the SD-1B has a very blues rock sound, with a tone that sounds as close to Joe Satriani’s Ice 9 tone as you can get without buying his Ice 9 overdrive pedal. This pedal can go from that glassy, smooth blues drive, to very big, Marshall style crunch. While not as important to the history of the electric guitar as the DS-1, the SD-1B certainly earned itself a place in the history books, as well as a solid 9 out of 10.

The Boss MD2 Mega Distortion Guitar Pedal

The Boss MD2 Mega Distortion Guitar Pedal

Third up on today’s list is a pedal that is very near and dear to me, the MD2 which was my very first distortion pedal, and my second pedal over all, next to a cheap no name chorus pedal. These two little boxes helped me figure out who I wanted to be as a guitarist. I bought the little red distortion pedal, mainly because it said “MEGA” on it, and I thought it looked, and sounded cooler than its yellow and orange brethren. The big, 80’s distortion tones that this little pedal generates were perfect for the junky early 90’s metal and grunge that I cut my teeth on in those early days. This pedal emulates the sound of a heavily distorted amplifier quite well, with all of the hard square wave style clipping that you tend to get from a rectifier equipped amplifier, but with a lot more lower end than you would expect.

The pedal can do some “lower” gain settings, that could easily cover some Zepplin or ZZ top tunes, but what it really does best, is straight ahead thrash metal, and grungy rock. Now, this pedal is by no means a game changer, and by now it might just seem like another little buzz box, but this pedal made me feel like my little knock off Stratocaster, and my tiny solid state amp were really capable of being a rock star, and when you’re fourteen years old, you just can’t beat that. While it doesn’t cover as much sonic ground as the last two pedals, the MD2 does score itself a respectable 8 out of 10.

The Boss ML2 Metal Core Guitar Distortion Pedal

The Boss ML2 Metal Core Guitar Distortion Pedal

Second to last on today’s list, is the ML2, which is designed for people who tune down, and dig in deep. This pedal has virtually no versatility, no matter what this is going to sound heavy and distorted, this pedal is designed to play metal, it doesn’t matter if its thrash, hard core, speed, you need to sound as distorted as possible, this is the pedal for you. With all of the low end this pedal has on tap, you might end up competing with your bass player in that territory, so you will want to fine tune this once you take it back to the band to practice, I’ve known plenty of guys who find the “right” sound, and then get just eaten alive at practice because their sound just cant pull itself up and out of everyone else’s frequencies.

The ML2 might need a noise suppressor before it, just so you aren’t annoyed by all of the hum that a pedal with this much gain on tap can create, but at the end of the day, this pedal alone does its job of being aggressive, angry, and brutal. The ML2 might not be very versatile, but for people who need this much gain on tap, it will be more than versatile enough. If you don’t play metal, this probably won’t be your go to guy, but if you tune down, and want to be as heavy as possible, this is probably the pedal for you. A solid 9 out of 10.

The Boss FZ5 Fuzz Pedal

The Boss FZ5 Fuzz Pedal

Last up for today’s giant run down of fuzz boxes, is a box designed to recreate the pedals that gave the term “Fuzz” to them in the first place, is the Boss FZ5. Designed to recreate the very first commercially available guitar pedal, the Maestro FZ-1A, the big gritty smily face pedal, the Fuzz Face, and lastly the pedal that one Jimi Hendrix made world famous, the Roger Mayer Octavia.
The Maestro is probably most well known for making the almost trumpet like sounds at the beginning of the Rolling Stones “Satisfaction”, the pedal worked a lot like much later Fuzz pedals, by driving the signal all the way into a near perfect square wave, and was almost monophonic as a result of how it actually clipped the signal. This setting was cool, and very retro sounding, but like its name sake a little annoying, as it was pretty much monophonic.

Next up was the Fuzz face setting, which was a lot more friendly to modern playing styles, as it still can play full chords, and clean up quite a bit when you roll your volume back. It’s very clear why so many guitarists have one of these pedals on their board, they just do a great job at sounding great. Lastly is the Octavia, which takes one of the artifacts of the Fuzz circuitry and boosts it, making it very noticeable, which is the fact that this pedal kicks an octave tone up into the same volume range of your unaffected guitar tone. This results in a very cool effect, that really does remind you of Jimi at Woodstock. This pedal is a must for anyone who covers any band that was big before the mid 70s, and for anyone who wants to emulate the sound of those early rockstars. The FZ5 scores a solid 10 out of 10.

World Music Supply | Jackson Guitars

Hey guys it’s Brian from World Music Supply here again, sorry for the lack of a post Monday, but it was Labor day here in the good ol’ US of A and I had to spend it getting caught up on school work, so to all of our American readers, I hope you had a better Labor day than I, and to our foreign readers, I hope you had a pleasant Monday. Getting down to business, in today’s blog, I get to take a look at some cool guitars from our friends over at Jackson. As I’ve mentioned before, the formation of Jackson guitars is actually pretty weird, the company was formed by Grover Jackson shortly after he acquired Charvel Guitars. Jackson was initially a brand name applied to models that were so far from the norm, that he was worried releasing them under the Charvel name might damage the image of the brand. The First major guitar designed for the Jackson brand was the Concorde, which was designed in conjunction with one Randy Rhoads. This sleek revamp of the Flying V design was a radical departure for guitar design at the time (the very beginning of the 80s) and the redesign of many other older designs became a hallmark of Jackson guitars, and by association the majority of the guitar scene of the 1980s, with sleeker, more slender, and pointier versions of classic designs.

The Jackson RRXMG Rhoads Electric Guitar Snow White with Black Pin Stripes

The Jackson RRXMG Rhoads Electric Guitar Snow White with Black Pin Stripes

In today’s blog I get a chance to review a “proper” Randy Rhoads with the RRXMG in Snow White with Black Pin Stripes, and a more typical Jackson with the SLX Soloist in Kawasabi Green. First up is the RRXMG, which is a fairly liberal take on the classic Randy Rhoads Concorde, with the smaller modern Rhoads shape, and more modern details, like a compound radius fretboard, a Floyd Rose Special, and a set of EMG 81 and 85 pickups. This Rhoads is a sight to behold, its sleek white basswood and maple neck through body create an amazingly resonant and tuneful guitar.

Plugged in this guitar has that standard 81 85 speaking voice, with it’s darker clean sounds, with a warm, mellow attack and long singing sustain. The added body that the EMGs give to your clean tone are very noticeable on a guitar like this, as the neck through design adds plenty of body to the tone as well, resulting in a big, fat tone, even on the thinner sounding bridge pickup. Playing all of the neo-classical clean passages that Randy strategically placed throughout many famous Ozzy songs on a guitar like this really helps define why these modern modifications to a classic design are so useful. The addition of a modern compound radius means that all of those single notes runs and complex chords without worrying about your hand cramping up or fretting out during fast runs, and the fuller sounding active pickups add a clarity and body that normal humbucking pickups just couldn’t replicate.

Plugged into a Randall RT503H and its matching cabinet, this guitar has more than enough power to match those classic RR tones, with all of the punch and power that made the Rhoads guitar so infamous. Running through every Ozzy song I had memorized, this guitar pulled more than its weight, with tones that were as close to the record as I’ve ever heard them, and with more than enough power on hand to go far further thanks to the powerful EMG pickups. Switching out of Ozzy mode, I was able to comp some more modern metal tones from this guitar as well, simply by dropping the tuning a little, and letting the EMG pickups do what they do best, be as loud as absolutely possible. EMGs have the ability to stay tight no matter how high, or how low the tuning, with increased sustain and harmonic response thanks to their increased output.

In short the RRXMG is one powerful machine, with sustain for days, and a look and feel of one of the most famous guitars in metal history.  For all of these facts the RRXMG earns itself a much deserved 10 out of 10.

The Jackson SLX Soloist Electric Guitar Floyd Rose Special Kawasabi Green

The Jackson SLX Soloist Electric Guitar Floyd Rose Special Kawasabi Green

Next up is the SLX Soloist, which while I picked the rather distinctive Kawasabi Green for the review, it’s available in both Black and Snow White as well. The reason  I picked Kawasabi Green out of the other two colors is simply, because one, it is very distinct looking, and two, because Jackson Guitars was made famous by a handful of shredders back in the 80’s, and nothing says 80’s quite the same as a neon green guitar. This guitar comes outfitted with a through body maple neck, a Floyd Rose Special tremolo, a compound radius fretboard, and a set of Duncan Designed HB102 pickups.

Plugged into a clean amp, the HB102 humbuckers are smooth and warm sounding, allowing for clean jazzy runs and slick chord tones, made all the more enjoyable thanks to the comfortable neck profile and the compound fretboard radius, which made it easier to chord on the low end of the neck, and play quick runs on the upper end, without ever feeling strange or inappropriate. The bridge pickup was just snappy enough to help me cut through, but not so brash as to make using it on its own painful or annoying to listen to, and the neck was warm and clear, without being too bass heavy or muddy sounding.

Plugged into the same Randall RT503H and matching Randall Cabinet, the SLX proved itself quite versatile, able to pull off everything from modern metal grind, with dropped chords having a big beefy low end to them without losing too much high end, and having just as much power when it came to playing more traditional styles of rock. Tuned up in standard, this guitar had no problem banging out classic 80’s riffs that range from two handed Van Halen style brashness, to Police style chordal runs. The comfortable radius of the neck made this all the better, allowing me to play more natural all along the neck, and the Floyd Rose made any style of dive bomb, swirling vibrato, and high flying trem arm acrobatics a breeze, always coming back to tune no matter what I threw at it.

The Soloist has been a hallmark of the Jackson line for decades, and playing this guitar I understand why. I think it’s easier to understand what a super-strat really is, and why that style of guitar ruled the market place for nearly 20 years when you play a guitar like this, with all of it’s amazing appointments and its sheer array of tones, the SLX Soloist earns itself an easy 10 out of 10.

World Music Supply | DBZ Guitars

Hey everybody, it’s Brian here with World Music Supply, and I’m here to talk to you about some of the cool new stuff that we’re getting here at WMS. Today, I want to talk a little more about DBZ Guitars. As I’ve mentioned before, DBZ is the brain child of Dean B. Zelinsky, who parted ways with Dean Guitars in mid 2008. In order to give Mr. Zelinsky “personal control over design, direction and quality” he started DBZ guitars shortly after his parting ways with his former company. Since then he has been crafting a lot of sleek, beautiful guitars, a few of which I’m going to discuss in today’s blog.

The DBZ Bolero

The DBZ Bolero

First up is the Bolero, a tasteful new take on the classic LP single cut design. This guitar is just different enough to feel interesting and just familiar enough as to not be off putting, it features the iconic mahogany body with a maple top, and a comfortable soft V neck profile on its mahogany neck. It features the DBZB/DBZ5 that I reviewed so favorably on the barchettas a few posts back, and they don’t disappoint here either. They have the right mix of bright and dark from the bridge pickup to the neck pickup so you never run out of useful tones in this guitar, and with the inclusion of a coil split, you also have some decent strat and tele esc tones hidden away in this guitar too. With its more iconic wood combination, of a maple and mahogany body, and a mahogany neck, this guitar tends to sound a little warmer than the Barchetta LT, and a little rounder the fire breathing monsters in the bare bones line. Overall this is a nice choice for the guitarist who wants to have an LP style guitar, but doesn’t want to look like everyone else, with so many powerful tones, and such handsome looks, I give the Bolero a 10 out of 10 easy.

The DBZ Imperial in Cherry Sunburst

The DBZ Imperial in Cherry Sunburst

Next up on the chopping block is the Imperial line, a guitar that I am outright amazed by. It’s a relatively standard looking jazz guitar shape, like a semi hollow body, but without the hollow part, what amazes me is that the Imperial has such a thin body, and when I say thin I mean 5/8 of an inch at the edge thick, that is THIN. 

The DBZ Imperial

The DBZ Imperial

The body curves out a bit more in the middle, but by and large, this guitar is so thin, when you wear an Imperial, it almost doesn’t feel like it’s there, which is an interesting, and comfortable feeling. This guitar sounds a lot snappier than the Bolero thanks to this thinner body, it’s somewhere between a jazz box, and a telecaster, as it has a little bit more of a twangy edge when played clean and a little more presence in the mix when played distorted, but it also has that warm round bottom end that is reminiscent of big body jazz guitars. With the inclusion of the coil splitter this guitar can do basically anything, from twangy country licks, big bodied rock rhythms, and if you drop the tuning a little, it can even grind out some serious metal. The neck is the same as the Bolero, that soft V that fits your hand like a glove, making playing very long sessions so much more comfortable. For its plethora of awesome tones, and its unique razor thin body, the Imperial easily snags a 10 out of 10.

The DBZ Cavallo

The DBZ Cavallo

Then we have the Cavallo, which is a classic V style guitar, with the slight exception of having a heavily sculpted maple top. This carving seemed strange at first, but once you start playing it, you realize that it is thinned only around the controls, and where your arm would naturally either swing when playing standing up, or where your arm would rest when sitting down. The Cavallo is oddly comfortable, and the sounds are just as pleasing. The Cavallo has the same pickup combo as the rest of the guitars thus far in the review. Its tones are a little bit bolder than the Imperial, but not as defined as the Bolero, playing it through a little tube amp, the Cavallo gave me everything from bone dry clean tones, dirty AC/DC style drive, all the way to big hair metal style grind. All in all I like the Cavallo, and as far as V’s go, this one is easily in my top 3. I give the Cavallo a 9 out of 10, only because those carves in the top might be a little off putting to people who like a more traditional V.

The Floyd Rose Equipped DBZ Cavallo

The Floyd Rose Equipped DBZ Cavallo

However, stepping a little more away from the traditional V mold we do have a variant of the Cavallo which sports a locking floyd rose, a welcome change of pace. Now I was able to do light fluttery warbles in the clean setting, Van Halen style dive bombs when I had the amp dimed, and when I used some real distortion I got everything from Dimebag style squeals to Joe Satriani style screaming harmonics. Adding the agility that a floyd affords you to an already amazingly versatile guitar takes it from a 9 out of 10 to a solid 10 out of 10, who would have thought such a little change would bring out so much more potential in this guitar

The DBZ Venom

The DBZ Venom

Lastly in the line up is something way out of the traditional, but what we all honestly expected from DBZ guitars, a solid down to earth metal guitar. The Venom is a V style guitar that more closely resembles a battle axe than it does the 1950s era styling of its cousins. Along with the much more metal stylings, it comes in gun metal grey, and silver, both of which help to accentuate the battle axe feeling of this instrument. Unlike all the other guitars in this review, this guitar is equipped with different pickups, that’s right folks, the Venom is armed with a pair of USA made EMG 81/85s that just scream when you play this thing. Its clean tone is a tad darker than the rest of the DBZs as a result, but this isn’t a bad thing as these guitars probably wont spend much time in a clean, low gain setting. With a distorted tone, these guitars come alive, with full bodied tones that have more than enough output for any situation, and more than enough bark and bite to fulfill any hard rock or metal guitarists wildest dreams. With its Floyd rose trem, and its wickedly hot EMG pickups, this guitar deserves more than the 10 out of 10 I can award it. Lets just say this, if you are hunting for the cream of the crop of metal guitars, the Venom might just be it.

So there you have it folks, some amazingly versatile, and amazingly powerful new guitars from DBZ, all of them with a unique voice, and their own amazingly unique styling,  so how about you go on over to World Music Supply today and order your own DBZ today, and quit looking and sounding like everyone else out there, start being unique with a new DBZ!

World Music Supply | DBZ Barchetta

Hey guys, its Brian here with World Music Supply, and today, I want to talk a little about DBZ Guitars. DBZ is the brain child of Dean B. Zelinsky, who parted ways with Dean Guitars in mid 2008. In order to give Mr. Zelinsky “personal control over design, direction and quality” he started DBZ guitars shortly after parting ways with his former company.

DBZ Barchetta LT Premier Series in Red

DBZ Barchetta LT Premier Series in Red

We here at World Music Supply currently carry the DBZ Barchetta, a guitar with all the sonic fire power and visual flash a modern shredder could ask for. We carry the LT Premier series in both the string through hardtail, and the Floyd Rose Pro equipped versions. This series of guitars all feature a heavily carved top, the signature Dean Zelinsky neck profile that is neither too fat, or too skinny, and a set of great sounding DBZ humbucking pickups. We also carry the Absinthe which is a Barchetta style guitar with a special Absinthe graphic, Grover tuners, a Floyd Rose Special, an ebonized rosewood fretboard and special diamond inlays. Lastly we also carry the Bare Bones Series of DBZ guitars, which are Barchetta style guitars, which all feature sleek graphic finishes, a Floyd Rose Special Tremolo, Grover tuners, and a set neck with an ebonized rosewood fretboard with upgraded bare bones inlays.

DBZ Bare Bones Series Devil Graphics

DBZ Bare Bones Series Devil Graphics

Ive gotten the opportunity to test drive a few of these guitars, and was thoroughly impressed by them in every way. The body style looks far more impressive in person, and pictures just don’t do this guitar justice. It hung comfortably on a strap, and the body bevels made it just as comfortable to play. The tone of these guitars is thick, with no range of the guitar over powering another, and the Floyd Rose worked wonderfully, coming safely back to pitch no matter how far I pushed or pulled it. The ability to coil tap the pickups was a fun feature, and provided me a bit of spanky, single coil tone, which is a nice addition to an already nice guitar.

These were designed by DBZ to be metal and hard rock guitars, and while I understand they were designed to be the guitar equivalent of fire breathing monsters. With the gain turned down I was able to wrangle some rather respectable classic rock tones, and with a clean tone, and the coils split, these guitars even do a fairly impressive impersonation of a strat, so even though they’re marketed as metal guitars, these are very versatile instruments.

DBZ Barchetta FR LT Premier Series in Black

DBZ Barchetta FR LT Premier Series in Black

Because of this amazing versatility, in my book the Barchetta series a pure 10 out of 10, as they are stunning guitars at a jaw dropping price, with features and quality rarely found in a guitar in this price range. So why don’t you do yourself a favor, and head on over to Worldmusicsupply.com and snag yourself one of these fantastic guitars before they’re all gone.